Writing and Publishing–Jan. 29

I’m going to try to start collecting useful articles I’ve found every week or so, mostly on writing and publishing news and tips. Some of these will be from the week, some might be older articles I’m rediscovering. Some will have been found through Twitter, some RT’ed through Twitter for those of you who follow me, but I hope all will be useful in some way.

Writing on the High Seas

Tobias Buckell writes a fantastic piece on the pirating of books, filled with actual data and a balanced viewpoint. He sums up my own views quite nicely — that is, general ambivalence towards piracy. It might cause some lost sales; it might also produce more sales and spread the word more. Ultimately, it’s hard to say for sure, but the energy spent trying to stop it is better spent just creating new stuff for people to buy — or steal.

Thinking Beyond the Book

Jane Friedman looks at how authors might want to think about their careers — beyond just writing a book, what they can do to expand their audience or make money in other ways. She covers in brief a lot of the things I’ve been thinking about over the last year or so.

Chuck Wendig

I love Chuck’s blog posts. They’re basically all laugh-out-loud funny, even when they’re not useful, and they’re often very useful. This week he talked about why no one in their right mind would want to be a writer, and then turned around and talked about why no one in their right mind would not want to be a writer. Taken together, the posts represent a pretty balanced look at the bonuses and drawbacks of trying for a career in writing.

He also wrote a wonderful article on the subject of writing advice — what writers should do with it, why he writes it, etc. A fantastic look at the issue, and he covers a lot of my own opinions on the matter — use the advice you think is useful, but it’s not all the word of god or anything. Use what works for you. And I write what I write more for me anyway.

Digital Book World

Finally, the Digital Book World conference took place this week. Publisher’s Weekly has a number of good posts summarizing the conference, but one of interest to me discussed children’s books and book apps, and how that whole marketplace is changing. I’ve heard this, recently, a number of places, and I think there’s potential for some really cool projects in this area — even sort of pseudo-transmedia stories for kids.

Writing , , , , , , , , ,

2 comments


  1. “I’ve heard this, recently, a number of places, and I think there’s potential for some really cool projects in this area — even sort of pseudo-transmedia stories for kids.”

    My first reaction to this was “Neat! That could be cool.” Immediately followed by a massive paranoia attack. I wonder if transmedia could be used poorly to target children for kidnapping or sexual assault?

    *comment posted by dys·func·tion’s paranoia*

  2. Well… a) The extent of a transmedia project aimed at kids would, I think, have to be a lot less immersive than some transmedia projects are, because a child would not necessarily be able to tell the difference between story and reality. The kind of project I’d be thinking about would just be about telling a story with text, maybe an interactive game of some kind, and maybe a video or animation… That kind of thing. b) No transmedia project should involve live events without understanding and consent to participate in a live event as part of a fictional story. A lot of the people writing about transmedia are writing too about the ethics of transmedia — the power it has to disrupt and the respect it must be given, the care that must be taken to ensure that it doesn’t do that. c) A good transmedia story is a lot of work and production money — seems like an inefficient method of kidnapping 😉

    Certainly a parent should be aware of what kinds of apps their children are using. But I don’t think there’s a real threat here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>